Resources     EGDI

EGDI

Ethnic Group Deprivation Index

Deprivation measures are used widely to understand spatial inequalities, to design interventions, and to target support to those in need. The Ethnic Group Deprivation Index has been developed as part of GEDI project. The Ethnic Group Deprivation Index (EGDI) offers a novel perspective by considering, for the first time, how deprivation differs by ethnic group and domain (type) of deprivation in neighbourhoods across England and Wales.
 
The EGDI has been created using a custom cross-tabulated 2021 Census dataset on employment, housing, education and health by ethnic group. The index reveals the small area geographies of ethnic inequalities that have to date received scant attention but have profound impacts on life chances and well-being.
 
The EGDI demonstrates that while one ethnic group in a neighbourhood may have high relative levels of deprivation, another ethnic group in that same neighbourhood may experience very low relative levels. The EGDI can be used to help shape locally and culturally sensitive policy development and resource allocation.
 
The EGDI has received a huge amount of interest from analysts and policy-makers working across a range of organisations, including local government, NHS Integrated Care Boards, and the third sector. Many of these organisations now have detailed plans to use the EGDI to inform their analysis and decision-making, in a diverse range of areas including, for example, equalities strategy, housing, and health and health care.
 
We have been working with analysts and providing bespoke datasets for local areas. Please get in touch if you want to know more about how the EGDI might be useful to the work of your organisation: info@gedi.ac.uk
 
We have developed an Ethnic Group Deprivation Index Toolkit. The toolkit includes resources which enable potential users to understand more about the rational for the development of the EGDI, the methodology behind it, and how to analyse and interpret the EGDI. The toolkit includes webinars and a practical developed in collaboration with GEDI partners the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG).
 
  1. Open access article: An Ethnic Group Specific Deprivation Index for Measuring Neighbourhood Inequalities in England and Wales
    Open access article published in The Geographical Journal (2023): https://rgs-ibg.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/geoj.12563
    The measurement of deprivation for small areas in the UK has provided the basis for the development of policies and targeting of resources aimed at reducing spatial inequalities. Most measures summarise the aggregate level of deprivation across all people in a given area, and no account is taken of differences between people with differing characteristics, such as age, sex or ethnic group. In recognition of the marked inequalities between ethnic groups in the UK, and the distinctive geographies of these inequalities, this paper presents a new ethnic group-specific neighbourhood deprivation measure—the Ethnic Group Deprivation Index (EGDI). This index, using a custom cross-tabulated 2021 Census dataset on employment, housing tenure, education and health by ethnic group, reveals the small area geographies of ethnic inequalities that have to date received scant attention, and yet have profound impacts on life chances and well-being. Drawing on the methodological framework of the widely used English Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) and for the same geographies (Lower Layer Super Output Areas), the EGDI measures deprivation for each ethnic group using data from the 2021 Census of England and Wales. The EGDI reveals the complex geographies of ethnic inequality and demonstrates that while one ethnic group in a neighbourhood may have high relative levels of deprivation, another ethnic group in that same neighbourhood may experience very low relative levels. The EGDI explores ethnic inequalities within and between neighbourhoods, complementing and augmenting existing measures by offering an important means of better understanding ethnic inequalities. The EGDI can be used to help shape locally and culturally sensitive policy development and resource allocation.
  2. Webinar: The Ethnic Group Deprivation Index for England and Wales
    Recording of Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG) Geography in Practice webinar which introduces the EGDI, its methodology, and previously published and new results
  3. Webinar: Analysing the Ethnic Group Deprivation Index
    Recording of RGS-IBG Geography in Practice training webinar, accompanied by practical guide (iv below). This session firstly provides a brief overview of the EGDI, including a description of its creation and demonstration of how the data can be used to understand ethnic inequalities in local areas (Lower Layer Super Output Areas) across England and Wales. The rest of the session is a hands-on training webinar, with a step-by-step guide to key steps of the practical exercise.
  4. Practical Guide to Analysing the EGDI
    Users will gain a well-developed idea of the characteristics of the EGDI and how it can be used to identify ethnic inequalities for targeted interventions. The outputs from the practical will include a profile of ethnic inequalities in a study area of your choice including mapped deprivation scores.
    Only limited experience in data analysis is required; some approaches to analysing the data are outlined using spreadsheet software. The practical also uses the free Geographical Information System (GIS) package QGIS, to demonstrate how to link the EGDI to area data (LSOAs) and map deprivation scores by ethnic group. > DOWNLOAD THE EGDI PRACTICAL GUIDE HERE <
  5. Webinar: Using the Ethnic Group Deprivation Index (EGDI) to Inform Decision-making
    Recording of RGS-IBG Geography in Practice webinar which outlines some potential uses of the EGDI. The project team show how the EGDI provides evidence on ethnic inequalities and how it can be used to develop policy and direct resources to those most in need. Presentations are then given by Senior Analysts from the London Boroughs of Tower Hamlets and Hounslow who are already making use of the EGDI for understanding ethnic inequalities. The session  provides examples which attendees can build on in their own work.
The EGDI Toolkit will be added to with additional resources over time, including: GEDI data dashboard; briefing as part of the GEDI 2021 Census briefing series; RGS-IBG educational resources.

EGDI Data sources

The EGDI is based on the following Census 2021 tables, which are all for LSOAs and cross-tabulated by ethnic group:

(i) Table 1 (economic activity), Table 3 (highest level of qualification), Table 4 (occupancy rating): Reference number: 1323
(ii) Table 1 (general health) and Table 2 (age): Reference number: 1373

EGDI News

Subscribe to stay updated

Get news straight to your inbox by entering your email in the box.

“Join our mailing list to receive updates on GEDI outputs (publications, briefings, etc.) and to hear about upcoming GEDI events. We will only use your information for this purpose.  For more information about how we look after your information, how to access your rights and who to contact if you have any queries or concerns about data protection, please visit the Queen’s University Belfast website - QUB general privacy notice”.

© 2023 GEDI. All Rights Reserved. Web design in Belfast by SMK Creations

magnifiercrosscross-circletext-align-left